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September 10, 2012, 9:00-11:00  Venue: CIGS Meeting Room 3

CIGS Seminar:"Sea Power, Sino-Japanese Security Relations and the Geopolitics of Continental and Maritime Nations"

On September 10, 2012, Dr. Alessio Patalano, Lecturer at Department of War Studies and Research Associate at King's China Institute, King's College London, lectured and lead a discussion entitled "Sea Power, Sino-Japanese Security Relations and the Geopolitics of Continental and Maritime Nations."

Presentations and paper
Mr. Kurihara's presentationPDF:821KB
Dr. Patalano's presentationPDF:4.4MB
Dr. Patalano's paperPDF:198KB

120910_kurihara_photo.jpg  120910_patalano_photo1.jpg  120910_patalano_photo2.jpg
(Mr. Kurihara, Dr. Patalano from the left)

Seminar's outline
Title: "Sea Power, Sino-Japanese Security Relations and the Geopolitics of Continental and Maritime Nations"
Presenter: Dr. Alessio Patalano
        Lecturer at Department of War Studies & Research Associate at King's China Institute, King's College London
      
Moderator: Jun Kurihara, CIGS Research Director

Seminar's main points
The sea is a factor of growing significance in Sino-Japanese security relations. Structurally, the People's Republic of China (PRC, hereafter China) and Japan are connected to each other through the East China Sea (ECS). Functionally, over the past two decades, the waters of East Asia have come to play a primary role in their respective national security agendas. The main sea routes passing through the ECS offer vital arteries for Chinese and Japanese trade. Fish stocks and natural resources in this basin are invaluable to food and energy requirements of both nations. The ECS constitutes also a main staging platform for the deployment of capabilities to defend national territories as well as for the projection of power (soft and hard) and influence in the region and beyond.
How do Chinese and Japanese strategists view the evolving role of the ECS in security calculations and how is this affecting bilateral security relations? Is the maritime nature of the theatre going to affect the ways in which China and Japan engage with each other, and if so, how? This seminar engages with the above questions investigating how, over the past two decades the strategic meaning of the sea evolved in both countries and how this in turn affects and is likely to affect bilateral security relations.

Presenter's background
Since 2006, Dr. Patalano is visiting lecturer in naval strategy and East Asian security at the Italian Naval War College (ISMM), Venice. In Japan, he has been a visiting scholar at Aoyama Gakuin University and at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), and currently is adjunct fellow at the Institute of Contemporary Asian Studies, Temple University Japan.
His first book, "Maritime Strategy and National Security in Japan and Britain: From the First Alliance to Post-9/11" (Global Oriental) May 2012.