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CIGS International Symposium "The Role of Innovation for Long-Term GHG Mitigation"

【Date & Time】

     October 07, 2016(Friday) 13:30-17:00

【Venue】

     FUKUTAKE Learning Theater

          III FUKUTAKE HALL The University of Tokyo B2F,

          7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo

【Notes】

     Participants are limited to 180.

     No admission fee required.

     Language: English (English-Japanese Simultaneous Translation Provided)


  Co-Hosted by: Policy Alternatives Research Institute(PARI), the University of Tokyo


Overview

     COP21 marked a remarkable success ironing out the Paris Agreement. At the same time, it has also left huge challenges to the future, in particular, very ambitious "1.5-2.0 degrees" temperature targets and "emissions/removal balance in the second half of this century" objective.

     The Paris Agreement has introduced "global stock take" to narrow a huge gap between top-down/unrealistic temperature targets (and mitigation pathways for achieving them) and bottom-up/pragmatic pledge and review process.

     However, it is extremely unlikely that these two approaches will converge in the foreseeable future since each country's NDC is driven by its own specific national circumstances rather than global temperature target. At least, the UN negotiation process will never close the gap.

     Innovation is the only solution. It is encouraging that the role of innovation has finally been clearly recognized in the Paris Agreement Article 10-5 which reads "Accelerating, encouraging and enabling innovation is critical for an effective, long-term global response to climate change and promoting economic growth and sustainable development. Such effort shall be, as appropriate, supported, including by the Technology Mechanism and, through financial means, by the Financial Mechanism of the Convention, for collaborative approaches to research and development, and facilitating access to technology, in particular for early stages of the technology cycle, to developing country Parties. Accelerating, encouraging and enabling innovation is critical for an effective, long-term global response to climate change and promoting economic growth and sustainable development. Such effort shall be, as appropriate, supported, including by the Technology Mechanism and, through financial means, by the Financial Mechanism of the Convention, for collaborative approaches to research and development, and facilitating access to technology, in particular for early stages of the technology cycle, to developing country Parties".

     However, judging from the past experience, the UN is the least suitable fora to address the issue of innovation. Given that only a few number of countries account for nearly all cutting edge clean technologies, it is meaningless to address this issue at the UN engaging 190+ countries.

     The necessary innovation will not occur in the bureaucratic and inefficient UN process, but from the RD&D efforts by the public and private sectors of limited number countries with innovation capability. The issue is how to trigger innovations through domestic enabling policy environment in such countries and possible international collaboration among them.

     On 2 June 2016, at the inaugural Mission Innovation (MI) Ministerial, 21 ministers from all MI partners released their respective governments7 plans to double clean energy R&D funding over 5 years from currently totaling approximately $15 billion per year to around $30 billion per year by 2021. They also adopted an Enabling Framework (see attached) and agreed to a mission statement to help provide a foundation for accelerated progress. This is all encouraging. At the same time, since each MI partner independently determines a strategy for clean energy innovation funding based on individual national resources, needs and circumstances and MI partners are encouraged collaborate on joint research and capacity building where mutual interest exists, it is relevant to explore good practices in such areas as;

  • Preparing enabling policy & regulatory environment for maximizing innovation potential in each country
  • Effective prioritization in R&D funding
  • Innovation analysis and road mapping
  • Striking a balance between prioritizing funding and avoiding the trap of "picking winners"
  • How to overcome various barriers for international collaboration
    - competition vs collaboration
    - inherent desire of local development
    - differences of legal structure, policies and regulations
    - different national interests in geopolitical and "geo-economical" agenda
    - difficulties in designing and administering collaboration programs such as fundin g level commitment among participants, defining rights of participants to enjoy the fruit of collaborative program (balancing IP and knowledge sharing

Program

Opening Remarks
13:30 - 13:35
Mr. Toshihiko Fukui, President, The Canon Institute of Global Studies
Keynote Speech
13:35 - 13:45
Background of CIGS Project on Climate Change (TBD)
The Canon Institute of Global Studies
Presentation 1
13:45 - 14:15
The Role of Innovation for Long-term GHG Mitigation (TBD)
Dr. Carlo Carraro, Director, Sustainable Development, ENI and Enrico Mattei Foundation, Vice Chair of Working Group III of IPCC, Italy
Presentation 2
14:15 - 14:45
A Road toward Zero Emission Society
Dr. Yoichi Kaya, President, Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth (RITE), Japan
Presentation 3
14:45 - 15:15
The Role of Domestic Policy on Energy Innovation
Dr. Laura Diaz Anadon, University Lecturer in Public Policy, Department of Politics and International Studies, University of Cambridge, UK
Presentation 4
15:15 - 15:45
How to Realize "Innovation Club" (TBD)
Dr. David Victor, Professor, International Relations, School of Global Policy and Strategy, University of California, San Diego (UCSD), US
Break
15:45 - 16:00
Panel Discussion
16:00 - 16:55
Moderator: Dr. Jun ARIMA, Professor, Graduate School of Public Policy (GrasPP), The University of Tokyo
Panelists: all the above 4 speakers + Dr. Masaru Yarime Project Associate Professor, GrasPP, The University of Tokyo

Issues for discussion include;
(Domestic Policy)
⇒How could the government strike a balance between prioritizing government RD&D on areas where the country has (could have) competitive advantage and maintaining wide spectrum of RD&D which couldeventually bring about unimaginable combination leading to innovative energy & environment technologies?

⇒What kind of domestic policy environment is necessary to stimulate RD&D of high-risk but innovative energy and environment technologies in the private sector?

⇒Don't we need not only technology specific support but also non-technology specific support scheme inducing innovation we don't yet know?

⇒If that is the case, what kind of non-technology specific policies could be envisaged to capture wide range of unknown technology seeds?


(International Collaboration)
⇒What are strong and weak points of existing international collaborative initiatives (e.g., US-China Clean Technology Collaboration, GIF, ITER)? Are there good models?

⇒Which area will be a good candidate for "innovation club"?

⇒How to overcome various challenges for effective international collaboration?
 - Conflict between collaboration and competition
 - Countries' inclination to "home-made technologies"
 - Differences of legal framework, policy and regulatory environment among countries
 - Conflicting national interests in geopolitical and "geoeconomical" competition
 - Trade barriers for energy and environmental technologies
 - Designing issues of technology collaboration (e.g., sharing financial commitment, sharing outcome such as IPR)
- Should clean technologies be regarded as "public good", which should not be monopolized?
Closing Remarks
16:55 - 17:00
Networking Reception
17:00 - 18:00
This Networking Reception is open to everyone attending the symposium.



Date October 07, 2016(Friday) 13:30-17:00
Venue FUKUTAKE Learning Theater
      III FUKUTAKE HALL The University of Tokyo B2F,
      7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo
Access 7 mins from Hongo Sanchome Station on the Toei Subway Oedo Line
8 mins from Hongo Sanchome Station on the Tokyo Metro Marunouchi Line
20 mins from Yushima Station on the Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line
10 mins from Todai Mae Station on the Tokyo Metro Nanboku Line

Access Map (This link will direct you to a third-party site.)
Others Application due date : September 30, 2016  【The Deadline has been Extended!】

(Lottery is drawn in case application number is over the limit.)

CIGS Office
environment(at)canon-igs.org
Please replace (at) by an atmark ("@")
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